Ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing : a rapid evidence assessment

Bagnasco, Annamaria; Cadorin, Lucia; Barisone, Michela; Bressan, Valentina; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Timmins, Fiona, 1967-; Watson, Roger, 1955-; Sasso, Loredana

Faculty of Health and Social Care
Ethical dimensions; Ethical issues; Ethical competences; Paediatric nursing; Responsibility
2018

Journal article


Abstract

Background:
Paediatric nurses often face complex situations requiring decisions that can be in conflict with their own values and beliefs, or with the needs of children and their families. Paediatric nurses often use new technology that changes the way they provide care to children, but this may generate ethical issues, and which nurses should be able to identify, understand, and manage in the full respect of the child.

Research question and objectives:
The purpose of this review is to describe the main ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing. Our research question was: “What are the most common ethical dimensions related to paediatric nursing?”

Research design:
A Rapid Evidence Assessment

Method:
According to the principles of the Rapid Evidence Assessment, we searched the PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL databases for papers published between January 2001 and March 2015. These papers were then independently read and analysed according to the inclusion criteria.

Ethical considerations:
Since this was a Rapid Evidence Assessment, no approval from the ethics committee was required.

Findings:
A total of ten papers met our inclusion criteria. Ethical issues in paediatric nursing were grouped into three areas: a) Ethically difficult healthcare situations; b) decision making problems; and c) Social responsibility.

Conclusions:
Only few studies investigate the ethical dimension and aspects of paediatric nursing, and they are mainly qualitative studies conducted in critical care settings based on nurses’ perceptions and experiences. Paediatric nurses require specific educational interventions to help them resolve ethical issues, contribute to the decision making process, and fulfil their role as advocates of a vulnerable population, such as sick children and their families. Further research is needed to investigate how paediatric nurses can improve the involvement of children and their families in decision making processes related to their own care plan.

Publisher
The University of Hull
Peer reviewed
Yes
Language
English
Extent
463 KB
Identifier
hull:12835

Journal

Journal title
Nursing ethics
Publication date
2018
Publisher
Sage
DOI
10.1177/0969733016631161
ISSN (Print)
0969-7330
ISSN (Electronic)
1477-0989
Volume
25
Issue
1
Start page
111
End page
112
Notes

This is the author's accepted manuscript of an article published in: Nursing ethics, 2018, v.25 issue 1.

Link
Published article
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