Illness perceptions of heart failure patients with an implanted device : relationship to psychological distress and quality of life

Eaton, Sarah Kate

Medicine
July 2007

Thesis or dissertation


Rights
© 2007 Sarah Kate Eaton. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the copyright holder.
Abstract

Background:
CRT and CRT-D are implanted cardiac devices used in the heart failure population. To date, there is an absence of research examining psychosocial functioning and non·medical predictors of CRT and CRT-D patient outcomes.

Main Aim:
To utilise Leventhal's self-regulatory model as a framework for examining cognitive and emotional representations in CRT and CRT-D patients. Factors considered were: anxiety, depression, physical and mental quality of life.

Methodology:
A cross sectional questionnaire based analysis of 151 participants split between three cardiac device groups (CRT, CRT-D and ICD). Measures used were, the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12).

Results:
A significant number of patients, across device groups, reported clinically significant anxiety and depression. Physical quality of life was significantly reduced in all device groups. In contrast, mental quality of life was within the average or above average range. Experience of reduced symptoms and a perception of the device as 'in control' were predictive of lower levels of depression. A perceived lack of personal control and unpredictable symptoms, were common to all groups, and was predictive of anxiety and reduced quality of life. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Publisher
Postgraduate Medical Institute, The University of Hull
Ethos identifier
uk.bl.ethos.478988
Qualification level
Doctoral
Qualification name
ClinPsyD
Language
English
Extent
Filesize: 8 MB
Identifier
hull:6501
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