An examination of the influence of cognitive, motivational, and behavioural factors on children's reading skill and development

Medford, Emma

Psychology
September 2012

Thesis or dissertation


Rights
© 2012 Emma Medford. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the copyright holder.
Abstract

The aim of this thesis is to develop a better understanding of the factors influencing children’s reading skill and reading development. In particular, the experimental studies were designed to investigate the influence of cognitive skills, motivational factors, and behavioural factors on children’s reading attainment. The results illustrate that both cognitive and non-cognitive factors (i.e. motivation and behaviour) influence children’s reading skill. The studies also show that the relationship between motivation and reading attainment is domain specific. Furthermore, considering a multi-dimensional approach to reading motivation, the results suggest that whilst intrinsic reading motivation and reading competency beliefs are generally associated with children’s reading skill, extrinsic motivation is unrelated. In addition, the predictors of children’s motivation to read were examined. The results suggest that children’s motivation to read is shaped by their reading competency beliefs and personality characteristics (particularly openness to experiences). Regarding behavioural factors, of all the classroom behaviours assessed, hyperactive/inattentive behaviour was found to be most closely associated with children’s reading skills. In addition, hyperactive/inattentive behaviour was associated with children’s emergent reading-related abilities. Finally, the studies examined the cognitive skills that support reading development when children are taught to read by a synthetic phonics approach. It was found that early word reading skill was largely underpinned by children’s letter sound knowledge, phoneme awareness (particularly phoneme synthesis), and verbal short term memory. These skills are consistent with the idea that the way in which children are taught to read influences the cognitive skills underpinning reading.

Publisher
Department of Psychology, The University of Hull
Supervisor
McGeown, Sarah
Qualification level
Doctoral
Qualification name
PhD
Language
English
Extent
Filesize: 1 MB
Identifier
hull:7081
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